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  • New center aims to use immune system to fight cancer, other diseases

    A laboratory within the Center for Human Immunology and Immunotherapy Programs (CHiiPs) will monitor changes in the immune system during clinical trials of new immunotherapies. The centerpiece of the laboratory, directed by Steve Oh, is a state-of-the-art instrument known as a time-of-flight mass cytometer that simultaneously can detect more than 50 different structures either on the cell surface or inside the cell. WU Record 4/17/14

  • Journal honors breast cancer researcher

    The Journal of Biological Chemistry has recognized Ron Bose and his colleagues for their work describing the combined structure of two proteins (HER2 and HER3) that, when bound together, drive growth of many breast cancers. This work was chosen as JBC's best signal transduction article of 2013. JBC 2013;288:25254 | WU Record 3/27/14

  • Surprising culprit found in cell recycling defect

    Members of Stuart Kornfeld's laboratory have identified an unusual cause of the lysosomal storage disorder called mucolipidosis III. They found that a phosphotransferase, which is responsible for adding the targeting signal to lysosomal enzymes, seems to lack a mechanism that keeps it properly localized in the Golgi apparatus. PNAS 2014;111:3532 | WU Record 3/12/14

  • Study shows 1 in 5 women with ovarian cancer has inherited predisposition

    A new study by Li Ding and colleagues estimates that about 20% of women with ovarian cancer have inherited genetic mutations associated with increased risk, even though most of these women do not have strong family histories of the disease. The research is the first large-scale analysis of the combined contributions of inherited and acquired mutations in a major cancer type. Nat Commun 2014;5:3156 | WU Record 2/22/14

  • Lee Ratner named Wolff Professor of Oncology

    Lee Ratner's primary research interest focuses on retroviruses, including the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1, which causes a specific form of lymphoma, and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) associated with AIDS. His studies have been applied to developing novel therapeutic approaches for these viral infections. WU Record 11/7/13

  • Evan Sadler elected to the Institute of Medicine

    Evan Sadler, chief of the Division of Hematology, has been elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, one of the highest honors medical scientists in the United States can receive. The Institute of Medicine serves as a national resource for independent analysis and recommendations on issues related to medicine, biomedical sciences and health. WU Record 10/21/13

  • Genetic errors identified in 12 major cancer types

    Li Ding and co-workers have identified 127 repeatedly mutated genes that appear to drive the development and progression of a range of tumors. For example, a gene mutated in 25 percent of leukemia cases also was found in tumors of the breast, rectum, head and neck, kidney, lung, ovary and uterus. The discovery sets the stage for devising new diagnostic tools and more personalized cancer treatments. Nature 2013;502:333 | WU Record 10/16/13

  • Database of disease genes shows potential drug therapies

    Obi Griffith and his twin brother Malachi, working with colleagues at The Genome Institute, have created an online database that matches genes linked to cancer and other diseases with drugs that target those genes. The database includes more than 14,000 drug-gene interactions involving 2,600 genes and 6,300 drugs. Another 6,700 genes are in the database because they potentially could be targeted with future drugs. Nat Methods 2013 Oct 13 | WU Record 10/13/13

  • University receives $26 million for leukemia research

    The National Cancer Institute has awarded two major grants totaling $26 million to leukemia researchers and physicians at the School of Medicine. The funding has the potential to lead to novel therapies for luekemia that improve survival and reduce treatment-related side effects. WU Newsroom 10/3/13

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  • Breast cancer test developed at Washington University gets FDA approval

    A laboratory testing kit that estimates the risk of breast cancer returning after anti-hormone treatment has received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The technology is a step toward personalized medicine and could help standardize breast cancer diagnosis around the world. WU Newsroom 10/1/13

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  • New models of drug-resistant breast cancer hint at better treatments

    Matthew Ellis and colleagues have shown that human breast tumors transplanted into mice maintain the genetic errors that caused the original cancer. Mice harboring these tumors are excellent models of metastatic cancer and could be valuable tools in the search for better treatments. Cell Rep 2013;4:1116-30 | WU Record 9/19/13

  • Discovery helps show how breast cancer spreads

    Working in mouse models of breast cancer and breast tumor samples from patients, Greg Longmore and his colleagues showed that a protein on the surface of tumor cells, called DDR2, binds to collagen and activates a multistep pathway that encourages tumor cells to spread. This finding may explain why women with dense breasts are at increased risk for invasive breast cancer. Nature Cell Biology 2013;15:677-87 | WU Record 5/5/13

  • Distinct niches in bone marrow nurture blood stem cells

    In research that one day could improve the success of stem cell transplants and chemotherapy, Dan Link and co-workers have found that distinct niches exist in bone marrow to nurture different types of blood stem cells. The new findings, in mice, suggest that it may be possible to therapeutically target support cells in a particular niche. Nature 2013;495:227-30 | WU Record 2/24/13

  • Doctors turn to genetics to search for cancer's Achilles' heel

    To develop more effective treatments for cancer, doctors are zeroing in on the disease's genetic drivers. Listen to John DiPersio and Merck's Gary Gilliland discuss how this may revolutionize the future of cancer treatment. NPR Science Friday 1/11/13

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  • Into adulthood, sickle cell patients rely on ER

    Analysis of Medicaid data of more than 3,200 patients with sickle cell disease shows that emergency room visits triple between ages 15 and 24. According to Morey Blinder, who presented this work at the ASH annual meeting in Atlanta, "This study highlights an emerging problem in transitioning pediatric age patients to adulthood and the need to explore new ways to facilitate that process." WU Record 12/10/12

  • Existing drugs may help more with breast cancer

    DNA sequencing studies by Ron Bose and co-workers indicate that some women with HER2 negative breast cancer may benefit from anti-HER2 drugs even though standard tests don't indicate they are candidates for the drugs. WU Record 12/7/12 | Cancer Discovery online 12/7/12

  • ASH awards Tim Ley the 2012 E. Donnall Thomas Lecture and Prize

    On December 12, the American Society of Hematology (ASH) honored Tim Ley with the 2012 E. Donnall Thomas Lecture and Prize for his groundbreaking work in the genetic analysis of acute myleoid leukemia that has greatly increased the fundamental knowledge regarding the pathogenesis of this disease. ASH News

  • Faculty profile: John DiPersio

    Throughout his career, John DiPersio has worked at the intersection of basic science, clinical research and patient care. While treating patients and participating in a large number of clinical trials, DiPersio has maintained a strong basic research lab. A major area of interest is controlling the trafficking of cells - stem cells, leukemia cells and immune cells - to different parts of the body. WU Record 11/16/12

  • $9 million to investigate blood-clotting disorders

    Washington University has been awarded funding from the NHLBI to support a new Translational Research Center in Thrombotic and Hemostatic Disorders led by Evan Sadler. Other local investigators include John Atkinson, Enrico Di Cera, George Broze, and Samuel Wickline. The research will focus on bleeding disorders, including some that are rare, and clot formation in both large and small blood vessels. WU Record 11/7/12

  • Deadly complication of stem cell transplants reduced in mice

    Jaebok Choi, Ph.D., Research Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Oncology Division, showed that eliminating or blocking the interferon gamma receptor on donor T-cells makes these cells unable to migrate to critical organs such as the intestines but still leaves them capable of killing leukemia cells in mice. Blood 2012;120:4093-103 | WU Record 9/27/12

  • Some breast cancers share genetic features with ovarian tumors

    A comprehensive analysis of 825 women with breast cancer shows that basal-like tumors, one of the most deadly subtypes, are genetically more similar to ovarian tumors than to other breast cancers. The study was co-led by Matthew Ellis at Washington University and Charles Perou at the University of North Carolina. Nature 2012;490:61-70 | WU Record 9/23/12

  • In lung cancer, smokers have 10 times more genetic damage than never-smokers

    Ramaswamy Govindan, Richard Wilson, and colleagues have identified 3700 mutations in 17 patients with non-small cell lung cancer, 5 of whom did not have a history of smoking. Surprisingly, the smokers had 10-fold more mutations than the non-smokers. In each patient who never smoked, at least one mutated gene that can be targeted with currently available drugs was found. Cell 2012;150:1121-34 | WU Record 9/13/12

  • Apr
    25

    Hematology-Oncology Grand Rounds

    Friday, 8:00 AM

    8841 CSRB

    Brian Hess: "Recent Genetic Discoveries in Myelofibrosis and Their Potential Effect on Prognosis"

    Angela Hirbe: "BRAF as a Potential Target in MPNSTs"

  • Apr
    25

    Friday Noon Conference

    Friday, 12:00 PM

    14th Floor NW Tower

  • Apr
    25

    Work-in-Progress Seminar

    Friday, 4:00 PM

    8841 CSRB

    Cates Mallaney (Grant Challen lab): "Interactions Between Dnmt3a and Repressive Chromatin Regulate Hematopoietic Stem Cell Function and Transformation"

    Mathew Cherian (Lee Ratner lab): "Role of the PI3K-Akt mTOR Pathway in Human T Cell Leukemia Induced Transformation"

  • Apr
    28

    Hematology Case Conference

    Monday, 12:00 PM

    8841 CSRB

  • May
    2

    Hematology-Oncology Grand Rounds

    Friday, 8:00 AM

    8841 CSRB

    Ken Krajewski: "TBA"

    Kevin Chen: "No More Needles? Clinical Applications of Liquid Biopsy"

  • May
    2

    Friday Noon Conference

    Friday, 12:00 PM

    14th Floor NW Tower

  • May
    5

    Hematology Case Conference

    Monday, 12:00 PM

    8841 CSRB

  • May
    6

    Genomics Tumor Board

    Tuesday, 4:00 PM

    3rd Floor CAM

  • May
    9

    Hematology-Oncology Grand Rounds

    Friday, 8:00 AM

    8841 CSRB

    Rusudan Hopman: "TBA"

    Armin Rashidi: "Photopheresis in the Treatment of Graft-versus-host Disease"

  • May
    9

    Friday Noon Conference

    Friday, 12:00 PM

    14th Floor NW Tower

    Steven Sorscher, MD: "Neuroendocrine Tumors/GIST"

  • May
    9

    Work-in-Progress Seminar

    Friday, 4:00 PM

    8841 CSRB

    Jian Zhu (Evan Sadler lab)

    Angela Hirbe (David Gutmann lab)

Featured Video

Lukas Wartman

In treatment for leukemia, glimpses of the future

By Gina Kolata
ST. LOUIS - Genetics researchers at Washington University, one of the world's leading centers for work on the human genome, were devastated. Dr. Lukas Wartman, a young, talented and beloved colleague, had the very cancer he had devoted his career to studying.... New York Times 7/7/12

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